We support the National Breast Cancer Foundation

Research is the only way to prevent deaths from breast cancer.

  • Breast cancer is the most common life-threatening cancer facing Australian women.1
  • One in eight women (and around one in 700 men) will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.1
  • Every day in 2017, 44 Australian women are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer and eight women die from the disease, leaving countless families devastated.1
  • The only way to solve this is to improve how breast cancer is managed and treated, through targeted and robust research.
  • Funding breast cancer research means that all Australians with the disease will live longer and better lives, ultimately preventing deaths.
  • NBCF is working towards zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030, through investing in life-changing research.

We’ve come so far but there are still major gaps in what we know about breast cancer and how we manage it.

  • More women are surviving breast cancer. In 1994 when NBCF was established, around 76 of every 100 women diagnosed with breast cancer were still alive five years after diagnosis. Today, 90 out of every hundred are still living.1
  • Life-saving medicines that are the mainstay of treatment, such as tamoxifen and trastuzumab, were developed as a result of research projects.
  • Breast cancer spreading to other organs (metastasis) is the main cause of death from breast cancer. Once breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it is thought that the number of women surviving five years is only around one-in-five.*2
  • Early detection is the most effective way to increase the likelihood of surviving breast cancer.
  • Knowing why and how cancer starts and spreads is key to preventing deaths.
  • The more we know about the different types of breast cancer, the more successful we will be in developing tailored treatments.
    * According to the American Cancer Society, five-year survival rates for metastatic breast cancer are 22%. There are no Australian figures for survival rates by breast cancer stage.

NBCF is the only national body that funds life-changing breast cancer research with money raised entirely by the Australian public.

  • NBCF-funded research has helped to detect breast cancer earlier, develop better therapies and treatments, build a greater understanding of how the spread of breast cancer can be stopped, and improved quality of life for Australians with breast cancer and their families and friends.
  • NBCF does not receive any Government funding — thanks entirely to the generosity of everyday Australians, more than $140 million has been awarded to around 470 Australian research projects since we were established in 1994.

Key statistics on breast cancer in Australia

  • Breast cancer is the most common life-threatening cancer facing Australian women.1
  • One-in-eight Australian women — mothers, sisters, wives, daughters, friends — will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.
  • Each day in 2017, 44 Australian women are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Eight women die every day from breast cancer, leaving countless families devastated.
  • Around one in 700 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • Every year in Australia around 140 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer. There are more than 60,000 people living with breast cancer in Australia today.

About NBCF

The National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) is the only national body that funds life-changing breast cancer research with money raised entirely by the Australian public. Breast cancer is the most common life-threatening cancer facing Australian women, with eight women dying from the disease each day — mothers, sisters, wives, daughters and friends.

Research is the only way to improve how breast cancer is diagnosed, managed and treated. By funding only world-class research, NBCF is working towards a goal of zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030.

NBCF research has helped develop better therapies, greater understanding of possible ways to stop the spread of breast cancer to other areas, and improved quality of life for patients and their families. Since we were established in 1994, we have awarded more than $140 million to around 470 Australian-based research projects to improve the health and well-being of those affected by breast cancer. With no Government funding, this money has been raised entirely by the Australian public.

Our goal is that by 2030, there will be zero deaths from breast cancer, a goal that would see more women (and men) living longer with breast cancer, and empower them with a greater quality of life. While more women are surviving an initial diagnosis of breast cancer — nine out of 10 women are alive five years after their diagnosis —once breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it is thought that the number of women surviving five years is only around one-in-five.2 There is still much work to be done.

We are proud to raise and grant funds exclusively for research, because we believe research is the most effective way to end breast cancer. We are committed to funding innovative research — from finding better ways to detect breast cancer earlier, to figuring out what causes breast cancer cells to spread, so we can work out how to stop it.

Every dollar helps NBCF move closer towards zero deaths from breast cancer.

Our research in 2017:

In 2017 NBCF has committed over $12 million to fund more than 30 research projects that will contribute towards our goal of zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030. This year we have continued to fund innovative projects that investigate new avenues for treatment, and new applications for existing treatments to improve outcomes for breast cancer patients. The researchers will explore promising areas of investigation, some of which include more effective immunotherapies for hard to treat breast cancers, targeted treatment delivery systems, and predictive tests for relapsing cancer.

NBCF is breaking new ground in 2017 by partnering with the Movember Foundation to fund translational research targeting multiple cancer types with a focus on breast and prostate cancer.  This translational focus has the potential to exponentially advance new treatments and methods of care for these cancers in comparison to an isolated, tumour specific approach.

Another core area of focus is to support and shape the development of Australian breast cancer scientists and clinicians into national and international opinion leaders. In line with this, NBCF will introduce a new Endowed Chairs program that will give high calibre Australian breast cancer researchers the opportunity to lead cutting-edge breast cancer research while also participating in thought leadership, advocacy and the mentoring of Australia’s next generation of breast cancer researchers.

Our research (overall):

NBCF research has helped develop better therapies, greater understanding of possible ways to stop the spread of breast cancer to other areas, and improved quality of life for patients and their families. Since we were established in 1994, we have awarded more than $140 million to around 470 Australian-based research projects to improve the health and well-being of the 60,000 Australians — mothers, sisters, wives, daughters, friends — living with breast cancer, to reduce the risk of our children and grandchildren dying from the disease, and to contribute to our goal of zero deaths.

Why you should support NBCF / what makes us different:

Research is the only way to improve how breast cancer is diagnosed, managed and treated. Because NBCF doesn’t receive any government funding, by supporting NBCF you are contributing directly to our goal of zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030.

NBCF research has helped develop better therapies, greater understanding of possible ways to stop the spread of breast cancer to other areas, and improved quality of life for patients and their families. Since we were established in 1994, we have awarded more than $140 million, raised entirely by the Australian public, to around 470 Australian-based research projects to improve the health and well-being of those affected by breast cancer.

Our goal is that by 2030, there will be zero deaths from breast cancer, a goal that would see more women (and men) living longer with breast cancer, and empower them with a greater quality of life. While more women are surviving an initial diagnosis of breast cancer — nine out of 10 women are alive five years after their diagnosis — once breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it is thought that the number of women surviving five years is only around one-in-five.2 There is still much work to be done.

We are proud to raise and grant funds exclusively for research, because we believe research is the most effective way to end breast cancer. We are committed to funding innovative research — from finding better ways to detect breast cancer earlier, to figuring out what causes breast cancer cells to spread, so we can work out how to stop it.

Every dollar helps NBCF move closer towards zero deaths from breast cancer.

NBCF funds people and projects

Researchers rely on grant funding to make new discoveries, improve our knowledge about breast cancer, and provide security for ongoing work: keeping labs open, paying staff and supporting families. Although critical to a researcher’s survival, writing and submitting grant applications is hugely time consuming and the funding is extremely hard to secure. For example, the success rate for eligible projects applying for National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants was less than 15 per cent in 2016.4

NBCF is one of many funding bodies in Australia – what makes us unique is that we focus entirely on breast cancer, and that all the money we raise comes directly from the Australian public; we receive no government funding.

We fund people; helping scientists early in their career conduct quality research that will enable them to build a more secure future specialising in breast cancer, and senior researchers who need the space to ask and answer big questions that will advance our knowledge about the disease.

NBCF also funds projects which propose innovative, potentially high-risk high-reward solutions to better detection, treatment and quality of life for those with breast cancer. Our project grants are often used as seed funding so researchers can prove the principle of their idea before seeking further financial support.

References
  1. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare & Cancer Australia 2012. Breast Cancer in Australia: an overview. Cancer series no. 71. Cat no. CAN 67. Canberra: AIHW
  2. American Cancer Society. Breast cancer survival rates by stage.
  3. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2014. Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2014. Cancer series no. 78. Cat. No CAN 75. Canberra: AIHW
  4. Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes, December 2016
  5. http://www.aihw.gov.au/cancer/breast/